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New Statistics and Data Science programmes at IIT Kanpur to boost health research

To help students build careers in the analytics industry and pursue higher studies in classical and modern statistics, the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Kanpur has come up with two programmes — a four-year Bachelor of Science (BS) and a five-year dual degree Bachelor of Science-Master of Science (BS-MS) programme in ‘Statistics and Data Science’ to be offered from 2021-22 session by its Department of Mathematics and Statistics. IIT Kanpur director Abhay Karandikar says that the opportunities in retail, banking, energy, telecom, agriculture, health and e-governance sectors make it the right time for students to engage in the field.

Similar to the other dual degree programmes, students would be admitted through the JEE (Advanced) exam. “The BS students, during the course of their programme, will have an option to convert their programme to a 5-year dual degree BS-MS programme wherein they will have the opportunity to do advanced courses in

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Understanding The Introductory Psychology CLEP Test

In this kind of scenario whenever women got frustrated and tried to challenge the system they were rebuffed strongly and they were ridiculed for trying to “imitate men”.

general psychology course online

The lab microscope is essential to every scientist, and is used everywhere today from medical labs to schools. Traditional IQ tests tend to measure just the general intelligence, and anyone with an IQ score of 145 and above is considered a genius. Yet IQ scores do not adequately measure the other types of intelligence. IQ tests don’t measure creative intelligence and yet highly creative people are considered geniuses. It is generally agreed that high creativity also indicates high intelligence. The logic is, when someone is highly intelligent and is able to manipulate several concepts, they are also able to come up with unique or creative solutions and ideas. Traditional IQ tests also don’t measure social intelligence or emotional … Read the rest

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PBSC Launches Construction And Health Science Programs

New degree and certificate programs in construction and the health sciences are slated to begin this fall term at Palm Beach State College to meet industry hiring demands.

With the Building Construction Management Associate in Science degree and related certificate, PBSC aims to bring much-needed new talent into the growing construction industry to replenish its rapidly aging workforce. The Associate in Science degree and certificate programs in Health Services Management, Surgical Services and Medical Assisting will provide employers with the better-prepared workforce needed to handle the increasing complexities of healthcare delivery.

Fall term classes begin Aug. 23, and prospective students may attend virtual information sessions for the construction programs on June 22, Surgical Services on June 23 and Medical Assisting on July 7. To attend, register at http://palmbeachstate.campuslabs.com/engage and search for either “construction” or “health.”

Building Construction Programs

The Building Construction Management degree and Building Construction Specialist College Credit Certificate

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Undiagnosed and untreated disease identified in rural South Africa

IMAGE: Emily Wong, M.D.
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Credit: Africa Health Research Institute

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. – A comprehensive health-screening program in rural northern KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, has found a high burden of undiagnosed or poorly controlled non-communicable diseases, according to a study published in The Lancet Global Health.

Researchers found that four out of five women over the age of 30 were living with a chronic health condition, and that the HIV-negative population and older people — especially those over 50 — bore the higher burden of undiagnosed or poorly controlled non-communicable diseases such as diabetes and hypertension.

The study was co-led by Emily Wong, M.D., a resident faculty member at the Africa Health Research Institute, or AHRI, in Durban, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Wong is also an assistant professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Alabama at Birmingham Department of Medicine and an associate scientist in the UAB Center

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Tracking anti-science views via social media could help with public health

In the realm of social media, anti-science views about COVID-19 align so closely with political ideology — especially among conservatives — that its predictability offers a strategy to help protect public health, a new USC study shows.

Resistance to science, including the efficacy of masks and vaccines, poses a challenge to conquering the coronavirus crisis. The goal of achieving herd immunity won’t happen until society achieves consensus about science-based solutions.

The USC study’s machine-learning assisted analysis of social media communications offers policymakers and public health officials new tools to anticipate shifts in attitudes and proactively respond.

“We show that anti-science views are aligned with political ideology, specifically conservatism,” said Kristina Lerman, lead author of the study and a professor at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering. “While that’s not necessarily brand new, we discovered this entirely from social media data that gives detailed clues about where COVID-19 is likely

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Who do we invent for? Patents by women focus more on women’s health, but few women get to invent

Invention and identity

Members of social groups may be more likely to patent inventions targeted toward their own group’s needs and interests. Koning et al. examined US biomedical patents and found that although fewer women engage in commercial patenting compared with men, their patents are more likely to focus on women’s health (see the Perspective by Murray). In an evaluation of biomedical articles, the researchers found that women were also more likely to make scientific discoveries that might lead to women’s health patents. These findings demonstrate that a lack of representation among inventors translates into a lack of breadth in inventions.

Science, aba6990, this issue p. 1345; see also abh3178, p. 1260

Abstract

Women engage in less commercial patenting and invention than do men, which may affect what is invented. Using text analysis of all U.S. biomedical patents filed from 1976 through 2010, we found that patents with all-female

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Team describes science-based hiccups intervention

IMAGE: The Forced Inspiratory Suction and Swallow Tool, shown here, is designed to stop hiccups on one or two attempts. It was developed at The University of Texas Health Science Center…
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Credit: Figure courtesy of JAMA Network Open

SAN ANTONIO (June 18, 2021) — Researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UT Health San Antonio) and colleagues worldwide describe a new science-based intervention for hiccups in a research letter published June 18 in the journal JAMA Network Open.

In the publication, the scientists coined a new term for the intervention: the “forced inspiratory suction and swallow tool,” or FISST. The team also reported the results of a survey of 249 users who were asked whether it is superior to hiccup home remedies such as breathing into a paper bag.

The need

“Hiccups are occasionally annoying for some people, but for others they

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KHN’s ‘What the Health?’: The ACA Lives

Can’t see the audio player? Click here to listen on SoundCloud. You can also listen on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Pocket Casts or wherever you listen to podcasts.

For the third time in nine years, the Affordable Care Act has survived a constitutional challenge at the Supreme Court. In a 7-2 decision, the court ruled that the states and individuals who filed the latest challenge lacked standing to sue.

Meanwhile, Democratic lawmakers are looking for ways to expand health benefits as they pull together spending plans on Capitol Hill. And criticism is growing of the Food and Drug Administration, which approved a controversial drug to treat Alzheimer’s disease over the recommendation of its own expert outside advisers.

This week’s panelists are Julie Rovner of KHN, Joanne Kenen of Politico, Mary Ellen McIntire of CQ Roll Call and Rachel Cohrs of Stat.

Among the takeaways from this week’s episode:

  • The ACA
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The Psychology Of Fear

The celebrity culture seems to take people to a persistent fantasy world and individuals are seen as discussing all aspects of celebrities from their shoes to their hairstyle to the cars they possess.

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There is a growing need for qualified laboratory professionals who use their skills in the detection, diagnosis, and treatment of illness and disease. Students in the affordable online Public Health degree program benefit from private school quality at public rates. Graduates are eligible to take the nationally accredited Certified Health Education Specialist offered by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing. A wide range of Universities offer the opportunity for potential students to spend some time in their on-site laboratories. This helps students get a clearer idea of the course content and learning approach, but it also provides an opportunity to see the extent of the facilities that would be at their disposal. Professional … Read the rest

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Corte Suprema se niega a revocar ACA, por tercera vez

La Corte Suprema se negó por tercera vez a revocar la Ley de Cuidado de Salud a Bajo Precio (ACA) el jueves 17 de junio, desestimando una demanda presentada por un grupo de fiscales generales estatales republicanos que alegaban que un cambio realizado por el Congreso en 2017 había vuelto inconstitucional a toda la ley.

Por 7 a 2 votos, los jueces ni siquiera llegaron a los méritos del caso, resolviendo que los estados e individuos demandantes, dos personas de Texas cuentapropistas, carecían de “argumentos” para llevar el caso a los tribunales.

“No procederemos más allá”, escribió el juez Stephen Breyer. “Ni los individuos ni los demandantes estatales han demostrado que el daño que sufrirán o hayan sufrido sea ‘razonablemente atribuible’ a la ‘conducta supuestamente ilegal’ de la que se quejan”.

Los dos jueces disidentes, Samuel Alito y Neil Gorsuch, no estuvieron de acuerdo. “Los estados han demostrado claramente que … Read the rest

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