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Cumulus Neuroscience raises $8.3M to develop EEG-based wireless ‘Fitbit for the brain’

Belfast-based Cumulus raises €6.9m for its ‘Fitbit for the brain’ (The Irish Times):

… Formerly known as BrainWaveBank, the company has developed a wireless electroencephalogram (EEG) headset and proprietary software platform that use advanced analytics and machine learning to measure cognitive fitness.

“This funding will allow us to build on the ground-breaking advances we have made in remote, frequent monitoring of brain activity and cognitive function in the home, in partnership with leading developers of digital biomarkers,” said Mr Cunningham, the company’s chief executive.

“We believe our integrated next generation platform can improve the execution of clinical trials by yielding significant time and cost savings, adding meaningful value to the next generation of (CNS) therapies,” he added.

The investment was led by the Dementia Discovery Fund, a £250 million specialist venture capital fund investing in, and creating, biotech companies pursuing transformational therapeutic approaches for dementias including Alzheimer’s disease. LifeArc, a

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Reading Our Minds: New book issues strong call to action to modernize psychiatry

The Rise of Big Data Psychiatry (The Wall Street Journal):

As a physician, I need to figure out three things when a new patient walks into my office: what their life is typically like, what has changed that made them seek treatment and what I can do to help them. It’s a complex problem, and most fields of medicine approach it by taking measurements. If I were a cardiologist evaluating a patient’s chest pain, for instance, I would speak with the patient, but then I would listen to their heart and measure their pulse and blood pressure. I might order an electrocardiogram or a cardiac stress test, tools that weren’t available a century ago.

Because I’m a psychiatrist, however, I evaluate patients in precisely the same way that my predecessors did in 1920: I ask them to tell me what’s wrong, and while they’re talking I carefully observe their speech

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Online Focus: Cancer Care

Strategies to deliver cancer care are focused on providing more comprehensive services under one roof, inspiring new layouts and approaches to treatment spaces to streamline diagnosis and treatment services. There’s also increased attention being paid to materials selection, biophilic strategies, and access to the outdoors to further support patients as well as the staff members and family members supporting the patient in their care journey. Below, find recent coverage of cancer center projects and planning and design strategies. For more, explore under the Cancer Care Projects section of the HCDmagazine.com website.

Better Use: The David H. Koch Center For Cancer Care At Memorial Sloan Kettering

The David H. Koch Center for Cancer Care at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in Manhattan has innovated the patient, caregiver, and staff experience via design.

Improving The Cancer Care Journey

Understanding a patient’s experience of care is the first step in designing a better … Read the rest

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PHOTO TOUR: Baptist Health South Florida Plantation

Baptist Health South Florida (Coral Gables, Fla.) has expanded its footprint in the tri-county area with the opening of an outpatient facility in Plantation, Fla., this past January. The 112,000-square-foot medical office building includes an ambulatory surgical center with five operating rooms and outpatient services, such as urgent care, diagnostic imaging, radiation oncology, physical therapy, medical oncology, and primary care. The building also comprises designated suites for services from the health system’s four centers of excellence, including cancer, orthopedic, cardiology, and spine care.

Designed by Gresham Smith (Nashville, Tenn.), the four-story facility has a clean and modern design that’s consistent with other recently completed Baptist Health South Florida facilities. Located on a scenic lake development, the interior features large windows that allow patients to enjoy views of the outdoors while receiving care. A neutral, warm palette is accentuated with pops of blues and greens, with each floor having a specific … Read the rest

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On centenarians, memory, Mars, tDCS, ADHD, digital health, beautiful brains, and more

Hendrikje van Andel Schipper (1890–2005)

Welcome to a new edition of SharpBrains’ e‑newsletter, featuring ten timely resources and research findings for lifelong brain and mental fitness.

#1. Let’s start with a fascinating story and study 🙂

Study with 330 centenarians finds that cognitive decline is not inevitable … (Henne Holstege, PhD, assistant professor at Amsterdam University Medical Center) said her interest in researching aging and cognitive health was inspired by the “fascinating” story of Hendrikje van Andel Schipper, who died at age 115 in 2005 “completely cognitively healthy.”

#2. Neuroscientist Lisa Genova, author of the beautiful novel Still Alice, releases non-fiction book on Memory: “It is sobering to realize that three out of four prisoners who are later exonerated through DNA evidence were initially convicted on the basis of eyewitness testimony. “You can be 100 percent confident in your vivid memory,” Genova writes, “and still be 100 percent wrong” … Genova … Read the rest

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Let’s welcome Mental Health Month (May) by appreciating our beautiful brains

Self Reflected was created over two years by a team that included neuroscientists, engineers, physicists, and students, and is a hyperdetailed representation of 500,000 neurons in a sagittal slice. Credit: Greg Dunn and Brian Edwards.

Between Thought and Expression (Cerebrum):

Greg Dunn was on his way to a Ph.D. in neuroscience at the University of Pennsylvania when he realized that bringing the brain’s beauty to life was a more suitable role for him than lab work. He started in ink, inspired by Chinese, Japanese, and Korean paintings and the similarities he found in the microscopic world of neurons and the macroscopic world of trees, flowers, and other landscape images.

Brainbow Hippocampus, by Greg Dunn and Brian Edwards

From there, he branched out to microetchings, gold leaf, scrolls, and murals. Microetching, which consists of creating animated images by precisely controlling light’s reflection off of surfaces, was invented by Dunn and

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Onward Expansion: Ochsner Medical Complex – The Grove

Founded in 1942 as the first multispecialty physician practice in New Orleans, Ochsner Health has evolved into Louisiana’s largest nonprofit academic healthcare system with  40 owned, managed, or affiliated hospitals and specialty hospitals, along with more than 100 health and urgent care centers. During the past three decades, much of that expansion has been taking place in Baton Rouge, which sits about 80 miles northwest of its hometown, including a 150-bed hospital on the city’s east side and about 15 smaller clinics throughout its metropolitan area.

In mid-2019, the system opened the largest single investment in its history—the Ochsner Medical Complex – The Grove, a $116 million microhospital with surgical center and medical office building all under one roof on the city’s west side.

Traffic snarls in Baton Rouge were a major factor in the expansion, as crosstown commutes are difficult there. “Baton Rouge has some of the worst traffic … Read the rest

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Ohio joins Indiana and Kentucky in funding Pear Therapeutics’ digital addiction treatments

Ohio is third state to fund Pear’s digital therapeutics to tackle addiction (pharmaforum):

The company has been pushing for more reimbursement of its three marketed DTx products in the US following a first FDA approval in 2017.

Pear said that the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (OhioMHAS) and RecoveryOhio are providing access to Pear’s FDA-approved DTx reSET and reSET‑O, for treatment of substance use disorder and opioid use disorders, respectively.

Funding is provided by the State Opioid Response (SOR) 2.0 grant, administered by OhioMHAS, and part of the US Department of Health and Human Services’ Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) SOR grant programme for people in need of prevention, treatment and recovery support for opioid use disorder.

The Announcement:

Pear Announces Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services will Provide Access to Prescription Digital Therapeutics to Help Local Communities Continue Fight Against Opioid … Read the rest

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Designing For Medical And Behavioral Health Comorbidity

In the United States, an estimated 68 percent of adults with a mental health affliction have at least one concurrent medical condition and 29 percent of people with medical conditions have a behavioral mental health disorder, according to a 2011 health policy brief by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. With the general population’s access to services often limited by availability, financial constraint, or stigma, these totals may be understated.

This medical and behavioral health comorbidity, which is the simultaneous presence of two or more diseases that encompass both mental health and medical conditions, can be due to causality, environmental risks factors, or even to chance. A 2008 report in the American Journal of Medicine by Dr. Wayne Katon addressed comorbidity of type 2 diabetes and depression, indicating that each condition can influence the other.

For example, depression has a direct negative effect on glucose metabolism and may increase insulin resistance … Read the rest

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Shape your environment, shape your mind

One of the biggest contributors to our happiness is something we barely pay attention to: the voice inside our own heads.

As psychologist Ethan Kross describes in his new book Chatter, that voice is constantly analyzing the situations we’re in, reflecting on the past and future, and telling us who we are. While sometimes friendly and optimistic—it’s OK, everything’s going to work out!—it can also be critical and downbeat. Our inner voice can berate us for mistakes or decide our life is ruined. It can ruminate on negative emotions and experiences, dredging them up without any kind of constructive resolution.

According to Kross, there are three main ways we can turn down the chatter in our heads: shifting our perspective so we’re not so immersed in our problems, talking with others to get support, and changing the environment around us.

The first two approaches work in the moment of distress: … Read the rest

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